Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) therapy is an innovative treatment that stimulates the body’s natural healing process uses the patient’s own cells to promote accelerated, long-lasting healing of certain musculoskeletal conditions.

This is a scanning electron microscope image from normal circulating human blood. One can see red blood cells, several white blood cells including lymphocytes, a monocyte, a neutrophil, and many small disc-shaped platelets.

This is a scanning electron microscope image from normal circulating human blood. One can see red blood cells, several white blood cells including lymphocytes, a monocyte, a neutrophil, and many small disc-shaped platelets.

What is PRP?

PRP definition - a platelet concentration higher than the physiologic platelet concentration found in healthy whole blood.

The PRP is often injected into areas within the body that have a poor blood supply to promote healing in these difficult to heal areas such as the plantar fascia (foot), achilles tendon (ankle), the rotator cuff (shoulder), tennis elbow and the patella tendon (knee). Also most joint surfaces and cartilage have a very poor blood supply so once injured, often the body cannot repair the damage on its own, which is one of the reasons why osteoarthritis becomes more progressive with time. PRP treatments are often used to treat healing and pain problems that have not responded to standard treatment approaches. The PRP treatment is performed in a doctor’s office and usually the procedure c an be completed within one hour.

Medical Definition of PRP

Many leading international researchers have agreed that PRP should be defined more precisely, and that the platelet concentration should be above 3x physiological levels found in whole blood to be labelled as PRP. This higher concentration of platelets provides a powerful cellular therapy of bioactive growth factors which are reported to promote healing by:

  • Tissue regeneration and rejuvenation,

  • induction of cell differentiation,

  • extracellular matrix formation,

  • recruitment of other cells to the site of injury, and

  • an increase in collagen production, which can increase skin thickness and overall skin health.